The Berghof was Adolf Hitler's home in the Obersalzberg of the Bavarian Alps near Berchtesgaden, Bavaria, Germany. He spent more time there than anywhere else during World War II except the Wolfsschanze, his headquarters in East Prussia for the invasion of the Soviet Union.

The Obersalzberg was bombed by hundreds of British RAF Lancaster heavy bombers, including aircraft from No. 617 Squadron RAF (the "Dambusters"), which attacked the Berghof on 25 April 1945. At least two bombs struck the Berghof and did considerable damage to the building.
18 May 2018 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
Where the red marble fireplace used to be in the great hall.
18 May 2018 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
Remains of the road that came up to the entrance staircase. Many world leaders have stepped out of their car just here.
18 May 2018 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
The back wall that protected the building.
18 May 2018 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
Where a sprawling picture window would be lowered into the wall to give a sweeping, open air view of the snow-capped mountains in Hitler's native Austria.
18 May 2018 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
18 May 2018 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
It's all now hidden away in the undergrowth (on the left). But the entrance roadway can still be seen.
18 May 2018 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
18 May 2018 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
Local innkeeper Karl Schuster bought the "Little Turk House" in 1911 and converted it to a guesthouse. Schuster became a somewhat outspoken critic of the Nazi takeover of the Obersalzberg, since this ruined his business, and he joined the majority of his neighbors who were forced to sell out to the Nazis and leave the area in late 1933. The building was first used by the SS-Führerleibwache, Hitler's personal bodyguard. Bormann later assigned the building to the Reichssicherheitsdienst (RSD), the high-level Security Service responsible for Hitler's safeguarding (some references say the Haus Türken housed the Gestapo, but the RSD was a separate organization). In practice, the ex-hotel served as a headquarters for the round-the-clock SS guard detachment, and also as a telephone communications center. Prisoner cells were maintained in the basement (above the bunker system).
18 May 2018 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
Off to the "Tea House" passing by the golf course ... it's a long walk!
18 May 2018 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
Although there is nothing left of the tea house building today Hitler would visit the Mooslahnerkopf Teehaus almost every afternoon during his stays at the Berghof. Each afternoon around 3pm Hitler, members of his close circle and a small number of his RSD bodyguards would cross the road in front of the Berghof and enter a path than ran past the Unterwurflehen (Obersalzberg Administration Building) then stroll downhill through the Obersalzberg Valley and onto a path through the woods.
18 May 2018 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
18 May 2018 Carole Riches
Photo by: Carole Riches
18 May 2018 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
In front of the Mooslahnerkopf Teehaus ("tea house") was a scenic overlook of the Salzburg Basin, enclosed by a wooden railing and with a bench where the Führer often sat and discussed matters of state with his intimates. From the railing Hitler could look at Austria, his homeland, Salzburg Castle poking up through a break in the line of mountains in the far distance.
18 May 2018 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell