The Cathedral Church of Our Lady (Frauenkirche) is a church in Munich, Bavaria, Germany, that serves as the cathedral of the Archdiocese of Munich and Freising and seat of its Archbishop. It is a landmark and is considered a symbol of the Bavarian capital city.

The south tower of the cathedral can be climbed and offers a unique, wide view across the rooftops of Munich and on to the Alps. In the entrance of this imposing late-Gothic interior you encounter among other things the legendary devil’s footprint in the floor of the church. Also worthy of note is the tomb of the princes in the space under the chancel. The oldest resting place in Munich for the Wittelsbachs is also the grave of Holy Roman Emperor Ludwig the Bavarian (1282 - 1347).
08 May 2018 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
The Great Organ (1994) on the west gallery has 95 stops (140 ranks, 7,165 pipes), which can be played from two four-manual general consoles (a tracker console behind the Rückpositiv division, and a second movable electric console on the lower choir gallery).
08 May 2018 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
08 May 2018 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
The interior of the aisled Frauenkirche, with its 22 tall octagonal pillars arranged in two rows, was remodeled in Renaissance style in 1601 but reconverted to a Gothic design in 1858. After the destruction of WWII, it was given a simply conceived but very effective whitewashed interior. Viewed from the porch with its larger than life-size figure of St. Christopher from 1520, the aisles and side windows are invisible, while the octagonal pillars of the nave have the appearance of a wall. At one time the window of the choir was also obscured by the high altar, and legend has it that the Devil, after inspecting the cathedral, was so delighted that the windows had been forgotten that he stamped his foot, leaving a print in the porch that can still be seen to this day. Other interior highlights include the sacristy entrance with its altarpiece of the Assumption by Peter Candid from 1620, the Baroque font in red marble with its early 14th-century Sorrowing Christ in the Baptistery, and the modern pulpit by Blasius Spreng from 1957. Also of note in the choir are the high altar by Hubert Elsässer from 1971, the cross in the choir arch by Josef Henselmann from the 1950s, and the old busts and statues by Erasmus Grasser dating from 1502.