The temple of Esna, dedicated to the god Khnum, his consorts Menhit and Nebtu, their son, Heka, and the goddess Neith, was remarkable for the beauty of its site and the magnificence of its architecture. It was built of red sandstone, and its portico consisted of six rows of four columns each, with lotus-leaf capitals, all of which however differ from each other.
17 May 2019 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
The modern Egyptian village of Esna, which was ancient Iunyt or Ta-senet (from which the Coptic Sne and Arabic Isna derive), was built in the area of ancient Latopolis and is the site of a major temple dedicated to the god Khnum. Under the Greeks and Romans, the city became the capital of the Third Nome of Upper Egypt. Besides Khnum, the temple was dedicated to several other deities, the most prominent of whom were Neith and Heka. This was the ram god that was worshipped through out this area and who fashioned mankind from mud of the Nile on his potter's wheel.
17 May 2019 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
Originally dating back to the 18th Dynasty when it was constructed by Tuthmosis III; around the 1500’s early 1400 BC it fell into disrepair and the existing temple was reconstructed during the Ptolemaic and Roman periods (332 BC to 641 AD) and was one of the last temples built in Egypt.
17 May 2019 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
17 May 2019 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
Though only the hypostyle hall was excavated by Auguste Mariette, it is well preserved. Other remains of the temple lie buried beneath the surrounding buildings of the modern town. The back wall of the hypostyle hall is the oldest part of this construct, having been the facade of the old Ptolemaic (Greek) temple. It has depictions of both Ptolemy VI Philometer and VIII. The remainder of the building was built by the Romans (Claudius through Decius) and some of its decorations date as to as late as the third century AD.
17 May 2019 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
17 May 2019 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
Just look at these colours as they are the original from 3000 years ago.
17 May 2019 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell