The Valley of the Kings also known as the Valley of the Gates of the Kings is a valley in Egypt where for a period of nearly 500 years from the 16th to 11th century BC rock cut tombs were excavated for the pharaohs and powerful nobles of the New Kingdom.

The valley is known to contain 63 tombs and chambers ranging in size from KV54 a simple pit to KV5 a complex tomb with over 120 chambers. It was the principal burial place of the major royal figures of the Egyptian New Kingdom as well as a number of privileged nobles. The royal tombs are decorated with scenes from Egyptian mythology and give clues as to the beliefs and funerary rituals of the period. Almost all of the tombs seem to have been opened and robbed in antiquity but they still give an idea of the opulence and power of the pharaohs.
18 May 2019 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
The entrance to the Valley.
18 May 2019 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
18 May 2019 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
KV62 is the standard Egyptological designation for the tomb of young pharaoh Tutankhamun in the Valley of the Kings, now renowned for the wealth of valuable antiquities that it contained. Howard Carter discovered it in 1922 underneath the remains of workmen's huts built during the Ramesside Period; this explains why it was largely spared the desecration and tomb clearances at the end of the 20th Dynasty, although it was robbed and resealed twice in the period after its completion.

The tomb was densely packed with items in great disarray due to its small size, the two robberies, and the apparently hurried nature of its completion. It took eight years to empty due to the state of the tomb and to Carter's meticulous recording technique. The contents were all transported to the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

Tutankhamun's tomb had been entered at least twice not long after his mummy was buried, and well before Carter's discovery. The outermost doors were unsealed leading into the shrines enclosing the king's nested coffins, though the inner two shrines remained intact and sealed.
18 May 2019 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
18 May 2019 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell
18 May 2019 Steve Snell
Photo by: Steve Snell